The Oregon Trail

 31,314 total views,  38 views today

Visit my Github page to get the source of the ported program.

In 1971 a text-based strategy game was developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann, and Pass Dillenberger. This game became what is to be known as the Oregon Trail. In this game, the player guides his party of settlers from Missouri to Oregon City, Oregon. Various random events plague the party as they transverse the rugged trail to their new home.

Most game players will remember the video game made famous with the Apple II and other computers of the era. Not many will remember that this game was originally a text-based game played on a teletype. This game version is the one I played in the late 1970s from my days in High School.

The version that I ported over to Python is the source code of the teletype version. It was written in Fortran and later converted over to Basic. The most significant obstacles in the porting were due to the nonstructured languages that it was written and the conversion to a highly structured language of Python while keeping the look and feel of the original game.

Before, we start going through all the different functions of the ported game, I must warn you that this is a long article. The game once completed is over 750 lines of code with out my section comments. Click on the GitHub link to access the full source code of the ported game. Here is direct link to the repository: https://github.com/KeithMFoster/the-oregon-trail

Game Setup

The original application used 40 variables to cover all aspects of the game. This version, seventeen variables are used and are wrapped together in a dictionary. This dictionary “game_variables” is passed around to the various functions of the game.

def setup():
    # set up the variables to be used in game
    game_variables = {
        # Identification of variables in the program
        # amount spent on animals
        "animals": 0,
        # amount spent on ammunition
        "ammunition": 0,
        # amount spent on clothing
        "clothing": 0,
        # flag for insufficient clothing in cold weather
        "insufficient_clothing": False,
        # counter in generating events
        "event_counter": 0,
        # turn number for setting date
        "game_turn": 0,
        # choice of shooting expertise level
        "shooting_expert_level": 0,
        # choice of eating
        "eating_choice": 0,
        # amount spent on food
        "food": 0,
        # flag for clearing south pass
        "south_pass_flag": False,
        # flag for injury
        "injury": False,
        # flag for blizzard
        "blizzard": False,
        # total mileage whole trip
        "mileage": 0,
        # amount spent on miscellaneous supplies
        "supplies": 0,
        # total mileage up through previous turn
        "turn_mileage": 0,
        # flag for clearing south pass in setting mileage
        "South_Pass_Mileage_Flag": False,
        # flag for illness
        "illness": False,
        # cash in your wallet
        "cash": 700,
        # flag for fort option
        "fort_flag": False
    }
    return game_variables

Shooting Function

On the trail that the wagons transverse, there are elements that the use of the gun is needed. Hunting, bandits, and other folk trying to stop you from completing your travel. To simulate this action, there is a function called shooting. It uses a simple loop waiting for a space bar input to time your reaction speed for shooting in the game. The faster you hit the space bar, the better the score.

When you run this game on a Mac, this function has an issue with the timer routine. It requires an administrator or better access to make this routine work.

def shooting():
    print("\nYou pull your gun, aim, and pull the trigger")
    start_time = time.time()
    seconds = 15
    while True:
        current_time = time.time()
        elapsed_time = current_time - start_time

        if elapsed_time > seconds:
            print("Pop")
            my_score = 5
            break
        if keyboard.is_pressed(" "):
            if elapsed_time < 1:
                print("Wham!")
                my_score = 1
            elif elapsed_time < 2:
                print("POW!")
                my_score = 2
            elif elapsed_time < 4:
                print("Blam!")
                my_score = 3
            else:
                print("Bang")
                my_score = 4
            break
    return my_score

Illnesses and how to handle them

On a journey in a covered wagon across the country, there is always a chance of getting sick. This section takes on that task, and based on how much supplies and how you ate so far, you might get better or not. Also, if you are stuck in a blizzard by chance, it will force you back to that storm to spend some more time there.

def illness(game_variables):
    if random.randint(1, 100) < 10 + 35 * (game_variables["eating_choice"] - 1):
        print("Wild Illness - Medicine Used.")
        game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
        game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 2
    elif random.randint(1, 100) < 100 - (40 / 4 ** (game_variables["eating_choice"] - 1)):
        print("Bad Illness - Medicine Used.")
        game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
        game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 5
    else:
        print("Serious Illness - You must stop for Medical Attention.")
        game_variables["illness"] = False
        game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 10

    # I'm sorry, but you don't have any more supplies.
    if game_variables["supplies"] < 10:
        dying("no_supplies")

    # There was a blizzard so let's return to it...
    if game_variables["blizzard"] == 1:
        return game_variables

    return game_variables

The Mountains

Part of the journey from the Great Plains to Oregon, is to transverse the Rocky Mountains. Of all of the sections and functionality of the program, this was one of the most difficult to port. The original code was littered with extensive go-to’s. If you didn’t know, early programming languages had a command called a go-to. This command much like the goto label in HTML, is used to jump sections of code. While this is useful, it led to some very unstructured coding techniques.

The purpose of the mountain section is to first determine that you are in the mountains, and what are the conditions of the trail that you are on. The mountain check function is the heart of knowing where you are on the trail. The further you are along the trail, the chances are greater that you will be in the mountains.

Once it was decided that you are in the mountains, there is a chance that you are in the south pass, where the travel is better. Either way, there is always a chance that a blizzard might blow in from no where.

A change that I would add would to make it either harder to hunt or not able to hunt while in the mountains. As it is at the moment, it is possible to hunt for the whole length of the trail.

def mountains(game_variables):
    # Are you in the mountains?
    mountain_check = 9 - ((game_variables["mileage"] / 100 - 15) ** 2 + 72) / (
            (game_variables["mileage"] / 100 - 15) ** 2 + 12)

    # A check to see if you have been caught in the mountains or not.
    if random.randint(1, 10) > mountain_check:
        # Congratulations you have found your self in the mountains.
        if game_variables["south_pass_flag"]:
            # Is there a blizzard in the mountains? If, there is a loop until the weather clears.
            if random.randint(1, 100) < 81:
                print("You have been caught in a Blizzard in the Mountain Pass - Time and Supplies lost.")
                blizzard(game_variables)

            else:
                print("You made it safely through the South Pass -- No Snow")
                if game_variables["mileage"] < 1700:
                    game_variables["South_Pass_Mileage_Flag"] = True
                    return game_variables

        else:
            print("\nYou find yourself in some rugged mountains.")
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 60

            # let's check to see if you have been caught in a blizzard or not. For the rugged mountains, the chance is
            # only 33%
            if random.randint(1, 100) < 34:
                print("You have been caught in a Blizzard in the Mountain Pass - Time and Supplies lost.")
                blizzard(game_variables)
            elif random.randint(1, 100) > 10:
                print("\nWagon Damaged! - Lose time and supplies.\nThe going gets slow.")
                game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 5
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 200
                game_variables["clothing"] = game_variables["clothing"] - (random.randint(1, 40))
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 30 - (random.randint(1, 40))
            elif random.randint(1, 100) > 10:
                print("\nYou got lost - lose valuable time trying to find the trail!")
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 60
    return game_variables

Blizzards

Blizzards are the single most deadly method of losing in this game. If you are caught, it becomes a loop until the chances are great enough that the skies open up and you escape. The change that I did during the port was to wrap the blizzard section in a loop until a break event triggers. The old code used a go-to to loop around to simulate the storm. In the new code, with every loop the chance of escaping elevates until you can leave the hazard.

def blizzard(game_variables):
    # Here is a loop that will run until the weather clears. There is a 20% chance that this might happen.
    base_chance_of_blizzard_over = 20
    while True:
        print("\nThe Snow and wind continues to rage.")
        game_variables["blizzard"] = True
        game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - 25
        game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 10
        game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 300
        game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 30 - (random.randint(1, 40))

        # This is where  we will check to see if you have enough clothing to survive the blizzard.
        if game_variables["clothing"] < 18 + random.randint(1, 3):
            game_variables = illness(game_variables)

        # Did the weather clear?
        if random.randint(1, 100) < base_chance_of_blizzard_over:
            print("\nHurray! The Snow and wind start to break.")
            break

        # every cycle, lets add 10 percent chance that the blizzard is over.
        base_chance_of_blizzard_over = base_chance_of_blizzard_over + 10

        if game_variables["mileage"] < 1000:
            print("\nThrough the wind and snow, you finally make it out of the mountains. But the wrong side.")
            break

        # You ran out of food, sorry.
        if game_variables["food"] < 0:
            game_variables["food"] = 0
            dying("no_food")

        # You also ran out of supplies.
        if game_variables["supplies"] < 0:
            game_variables["supplies"] = 0
            dying("no_supplies")

        # slow down the loop, so it is readable for the user.
        time.sleep(5)
    return game_variables

Dying

If someone brought up the game The Oregon Trail, everyone will remember the line “You died of dysentery”. The original game, it was injury or pneumonia. The famous line was used in the Apple port in the later 70s.

This is the routine that takes the reason of your death and outputs a simple obituary for your sad user. When we play this game, there is a good chance of dying and also includes the extra bill to be paid for the next of kin telegraph.

def dying(reason):
    if reason != "":
        if reason == "no_food":
            print("You ran out of food and starved to death.")
        elif reason == "no_doctor":
            print("You can't afford a doctor.")
        elif reason == "no_supplies":
            print("You ran out of medical supplies")
        elif reason == "injury":
            # mishap = "pneumonia."
            mishap = "injuries."
            print("You died of " + mishap)

    print("Due to your unfortunate situation, there are a few")
    print("formalities we must go through\n")
    print("Would you like a minister?")
    print("Would you like a fancy funeral?")
    print("Would you like us to inform your next of kin?")

    print("But your Aunt Sadie in St. Louis is really worried about you.")

    print("That will be $4.50 for the telegraph charge.\n")
    print("We thank you for this information and we are sorry you")
    print("didn't make it to the great territory of Oregon")
    print("Better luck next time.\n\n")
    print("\tSincerely,")
    print("\tThe Oregon City Chamber of Commerce")

Buying Routine

My port of the game, I converted the buying section of the program to a function that could be called for every purchase. The new routine takes the object and the minimum, maximum amounts that could be used to purchase the object. A while loop was used to ensure that the player stayed within the limits of the purchase allotment.

def buying_routine(object_name, min_amount, max_amount, wallet):
    my_purchase = 0
    while True:
        try:
            my_purchase = int(builtins.input(
                "Wallet: " + str(wallet) + ". How much do you want to spend on your " + object_name + ": "))
        except ValueError:
            print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        if my_purchase < min_amount:
            print("Sorry, that is not enough.")
            continue
        elif my_purchase > max_amount:
            print("Sorry, that is too much.")
            continue
        elif my_purchase > wallet:
            print("You don't have that much - keep your spending down.")
        else:
            break
    return my_purchase

Initial Purchases

Upon starting the game, the player is required to buy the items to assist them across the country. This function relies on another function – buying_routine to handle the actual purchase. If all of the purchases are within the amount of money in your wallet, the function passes control back to the calling routine. Otherwise, it will call itself again in another attempt for the player to make all of the purchases with what cash on hand that they have.

A little game tip: I found that 250 for the oxen, and 100 for all else is a good starting point. It leaves you with 50 dollars left for purchases at the fort.

def initial_purchases(game_variables):
    # Oxen Team
    oxen = buying_routine("oxen team", 200, 300, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - oxen
    # food
    food = buying_routine("food", 1, 99999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - food

    # ammo
    ammo = buying_routine("ammunition", 1, 99999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - ammo

    # clothing
    clothing = buying_routine("clothing", 1, 99999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - clothing

    # miscellaneous supplies
    misc = buying_routine("miscellaneous supplies", 1, 99999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - misc

    total = 700 - oxen - clothing - ammo - food - misc
    if total < 0:
        print("You Overspent -- You only had $700 to spend. Try Again.")
        initial_purchases(game_variables)

    ammo = ammo * 50
    print("After all your purchases. You now have %d dollars left." % total)

    game_variables["cash"] = total
    game_variables["animals"] = oxen
    game_variables["ammunition"] = ammo
    game_variables["clothing"] = clothing
    game_variables["food"] = food
    game_variables["supplies"] = misc

    return game_variables

Instructions

All great games need instructions. In this game, this is the function that printed out to the console the instructions to the game. I kept it as close as possible as the original game with in regards to how it prints out the instructions. Another approach that I used in other programs, is to place the instructions in a text file, and just print out the file contents when requested.

def instructions():
    print("This program simulates a trip over the oregon trail from Independence,")
    print("Missouri to Oregon City, Oregon in 1847 your family of five will cover")
    print("the 2040 mile Oregon Trail in 5-6 months --- if you make it alive.\n")
    print("You had saved $900 to spend for the trip, and you've just paid $200 for a wagon.")
    print("You will need to spend the rest of your money on the following items:\n")
    print("     Oxen - you can spend $200-$300 on your team")
    print("            the more you spend, the faster you'll go")
    print("            because you'll have better animals\n")
    print("     Food - the more you have, the less chance there")
    print("            is of getting sick\n")
    print("     Ammunition - $1 buys a belt of 50 bullets")
    print("            you will need bullets for attacks by animals")
    print("            and bandits, and for hunting food\n")
    print("     Clothing - this is especially important for the cold")
    print("            weather you will encounter when crossing")
    print("            the mountains\n")
    print("     Miscellaneous supplies - this includes medicine and")
    print("            other things you will need for sickness and")
    print("            emergency repairs\n\n")
    print("You can spend all your money before you start your trip -")
    print("or you can save some of your cash to spend at forts along")
    print("the way when you run low. However, items cost more at")
    print("the forts. You can also go hunting along the way to get")
    print("more food.\n")
    print("Whenever you have to use your trusty rifle along the way,")
    print("you will be told to type in a word (one that sounds like a ")
    print("gun shot). the faster you type in that word and hit the")
    print("'return' key, the better luck you'll have with your gun.\n")
    print("at each turn, all items are shown in dollar amounts")
    print("except bullets")
    print("when asked to enter money amounts, don't use a ""$"".\n")
    print("good luck!!!")

Instructions Print Out

This program simulates a trip over the Oregon trail from Independence,
Missouri to Oregon City, Oregon in 1847 your family of five will cover
the 2040 mile Oregon Trail in 5-6 months --- if you make it alive.

You had saved $900 to spend for the trip, and you've just paid $200 for a wagon.
You will need to spend the rest of your money on the following items:

     Oxen - you can spend $200-$300 on your team
            the more you spend, the faster you'll go
            because you'll have better animals

     Food - the more you have, the less chance there
            is of getting sick

     Ammunition - $1 buys a belt of 50 bullets
            you will need bullets for attacks by animals
            and bandits, and for hunting food

     Clothing - this is especially important for the cold
            weather you will encounter when crossing
            the mountains

     Miscellaneous supplies - this includes medicine and
            other things you will need for sickness and
            emergency repairs

You can spend all your money before you start your trip -
or you can save some of your cash to spend at forts along
the way when you run low. However, items cost more at
the forts. You can also go hunting along the way to get
more food.

Whenever you have to use your trusty rifle along the way,
you will be told to type in a word (one that sounds like a 
gun shot). the faster you type in that word and hit the
'return' key, the better luck you'll have with your gun.

at each turn, all items are shown in dollar amounts except bullets
when asked to enter money amounts, don't use a $.

good luck!!!

User Statistics

The User Statistics is a short function that shows essential information such as food, bullets, etc., to the player. The source had this in multiple locations in the code, and a simple callable function is cleaner.

def user_stats(game_variables):
    # If any of the variables are below zero, we will set them to zero here.
    if game_variables["food"] < 0:
        game_variables["food"] = 0
    if game_variables["ammunition"] < 0:
        game_variables["ammunition"] = 0
    if game_variables["clothing"] < 0:
        game_variables["clothing"] = 0
    if game_variables["supplies"] < 0:
        game_variables["supplies"] = 0
    if game_variables["cash"] < 0:
        game_variables["cash"] = 0

    print("Food:            % d" % game_variables["food"])
    print("Bullets:         % d" % game_variables["ammunition"])
    print("Clothing:        % d" % game_variables["clothing"])
    print("Misc. Supplies:  % d" % game_variables["supplies"])
    print("Cash:            % d" % game_variables["cash"])
    return

The Final Turn

The final turn is a function called upon reaching the end of the trail. If your mileage has exceeded 2040 miles during the game, this function is called to end the game. The central part of this function is to calculate which day you finally crossed the finish line.

def final_turn(game_variables):
    print("\nYou finally arrived at Oregon City\nafter 2040 long miles - Hooray!!\nA Real Pioneer!")
    time_calculation = (2040 - game_variables["turn_mileage"]) / (
                game_variables["mileage"] - game_variables["turn_mileage"])
    game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] + (1 - time_calculation) * (8 + 5 * game_variables["eating_choice"])

    time_calculation = int(time_calculation * 14)
    game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] * 14 + time_calculation

    if time_calculation < 0:
        time_calculation = 0

    if time_calculation > 6:
        time_calculation = 6

    days_list = ["Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday", "Sunday"]
    the_day = days_list[time_calculation]

    if game_variables["game_turn"] < 124:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 93
        print(the_day + ", July " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")
    elif game_variables["game_turn"] < 155:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 124
        print(the_day + ", August " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")
    elif game_variables["game_turn"] < 185:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 155
        print(the_day + ", September " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")
    elif game_variables["game_turn"] < 216:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 185
        print(the_day + ", October " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")
    elif game_variables["game_turn"] < 246:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 216
        print(the_day + ", November " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")
    else:
        game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] - 246
        print(the_day + ", December " + str(game_variables["game_turn"]) + ", 1847")

    user_stats(game_variables)
    print("\tPresident James K. Polk sends you his\n\theartiest congratulations")
    print("\tAnd wishes you a prosperous life ahead\n\tat you new home.")

The Game Loop

def game_loop(game_variables):
    input_x = 0
    if game_variables["food"] < 0:
        game_variables["food"] = 0

    if game_variables["ammunition"] < 0:
        game_variables["ammunition"] = 0

    if game_variables["clothing"] < 0:
        game_variables["clothing"] = 0

    if game_variables["supplies"] < 0:
        game_variables["supplies"] = 0

    if game_variables["food"] < 13:
        print("\n\nYou'd better do some hunting or buy food and soon!!!!")

    game_variables["food"] = int(game_variables["food"])
    game_variables["ammunition"] = int(game_variables["ammunition"])
    game_variables["clothing"] = int(game_variables["clothing"])
    game_variables["supplies"] = int(game_variables["supplies"])
    game_variables["cash"] = int(game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["mileage"] = int(game_variables["mileage"])

    game_variables["turn_mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"]

    if game_variables["illness"] or game_variables["injury"]:
        game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - 20
        game_variables["illness"] = False
        game_variables["injury"] = False
        if game_variables["cash"] < 0:
            dying("no_doctor")
        print("Doctor's Bill is $20.")

    if game_variables["South_Pass_Mileage_Flag"]:
        print("Total Mileage:   950")
    else:
        print("Total Mileage:   % d" % game_variables["mileage"])
    user_stats(game_variables)

    if not game_variables["fort_flag"]:
        while True:
            try:
                input_x = int(builtins.input("\nDo you want to (1) Hunt, or (2) Continue: "))
            except ValueError:
                print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
            if input_x < 1 or input_x > 2:
                input_x = 3
                break
            elif input_x == 2 and game_variables["ammunition"] < 39:
                print("TOUGH -- You need more bullets to go hunting.")
            else:
                game_variables["fort_flag"] = True
                input_x = input_x + 1
                break
    else:
        while True:
            try:
                input_x = int(builtins.input("\nDo you want to (1) Stop at the next fort, (2) Hunt, or (3) Continue: "))
            except ValueError:
                print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
            if input_x < 1 or input_x > 3:
                input_x = 3
                break
            elif input_x == 2 and game_variables["ammunition"] < 39:
                print("TOUGH -- You need more bullets to go hunting.")
            else:
                break

    if input_x == 1:
        game_variables = fort(game_variables)
    elif input_x == 2:
        game_variables = hunting(game_variables)

    if game_variables["food"] < 14:
        dying("no_food")
    while True:
        try:
            input_x = int(builtins.input("Do you want to eat (1) Poorly, (2) Moderately, or (3) Well: "))
        except ValueError:
            print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        if (game_variables["food"] - (8 - 5 * input_x)) < game_variables["food"]:
            print("You can't eat that well.")
        elif input_x == 2 and game_variables["ammunition"] < 39:
            print("TOUGH -- You need more bullets to go hunting.")
        else:
            break
    game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - (8 + 5 * input_x)
    game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] + 200 + (
            game_variables["animals"] - 220) / 5 + random.randint(1, 10)
    game_variables["insufficient_clothing"] = False
    game_variables["blizzard"] = False

    return game_variables

Visiting a Fort

Every other week during the game, the option to visit a fort is presented to the player. The source code used an integer since Booleans were not available. The integer swapped between zero and one to indicate if a fort was known during this game turn. I converted all of those integers to Booleans.

If you notice, I use the same buying routine as was used in the initial purchase function. But, this time, all purchases are only two-thirds the quantity of the initial purchases. This simulates that it costs more to purchase at the fort than wherever the wagon train started.

def fort(game_variables):
    print("Enter what you wish to spend on the following:")
    # food
    food = buying_routine("food", 0, 9999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - food
    game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] + int(.66 * food)

    # ammo
    ammo = buying_routine("ammo", 0, 9999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - ammo
    game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] + int(.66 * ammo) * 50

    # clothing
    clothing = buying_routine("clothing", 0, 9999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - clothing
    game_variables["clothing"] = game_variables["clothing"] + int(.66 * ammo) * 50

    # miscellaneous supplies
    misc = buying_routine("clothing", 0, 9999, game_variables["cash"])
    game_variables["cash"] = game_variables["cash"] - misc
    game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] + int(.66 * misc)

    game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 45

    return game_variables

Hunting

Hunting is another way to increase the food that your settlers will use during your trip. It will utilize the shooting routine I described earlier to see how fast you shoot. The faster you shoot, the better your chance of getting more food.

def hunting(game_variables):
    # let's check to see if you have enough bullets to go hunting. You need 39 or more.
    if game_variables["ammunition"] > 39:
        my_shooting = shooting()
        game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - (random.randint(1, 10) * 3)

        if my_shooting > 4:
            print("You Missed -- and your dinner got away..")
        elif my_shooting < 3:
            print("Right Between the Eyes - You got a big one!! Full bellies tonight!")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] + 52 + (my_shooting * 6)
        else:
            print("Nice Shot! Right on target - Good Eatin' Tonight")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] + 48 - (my_shooting * 2)
    else:
        print("You need more bullets to go hunting.")

    game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 45
    if game_variables["food"] < 14:
        dying("no_food")

    return game_variables

The Event Loop

Every game cycle, an event might happen. These events are sixteen and will happen only one and in order. As you read the section, out of the 16, there is only one that would be helpful, and all of the others are not very helpful.

def do_events(game_variables):
    if random.randint(1, 100) < 50:
        # 33% chance that an event would happen. But, each event would be an incremental sequence
        # of events. If by chance the user has over 16 events, it will be just #16.
        game_variables["event_counter"] = game_variables["event_counter"] + 1
        new_event = game_variables["event_counter"]

        if new_event == 1:
            print("Wagon breaks down - lose time and supplies fixing it")
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 8
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - random.randint(1, 5)
        elif new_event == 2:
            print("Ox injures leg - slows you down for the rest of trip")
            game_variables["animals"] = game_variables["animals"] - 20
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 25
        elif new_event == 3:
            print("Bad Luck - Your daughter broke her arm\nYou had to stop and use supplies to make a sling.")
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 5
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
        elif new_event == 4:
            print("Ox wanders off - spend time looking for it.")
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 17
        elif new_event == 5:
            print("Your son gets lost - spend half the day looking for him")
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 10
        elif new_event == 6:
            print("Unsafe water - lose time looking for a clean spring.")
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - random.randint(1, 10) - 2
        elif new_event == 7:
            print("Heavy rains - time and supplies lost")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - 10
            game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 500
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 15
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - random.randint(1, 10) - 5
        elif new_event == 8:
            print("Bandits Attack!")
            my_shooting = shooting()
            game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - (my_shooting * 20)
            if game_variables["ammunition"] < 1:
                print("You ran out of bullets - They get lots of cash")
                game_variables["cash"] = int(game_variables["cash"] / 3)
                print("You got shot in the leg and they took one of your oxen.")
                game_variables["injury"] = True
                print("Better have a doc look at your wound.")
                game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 5
                game_variables["animals"] = game_variables["animals"] - 20
            else:
                print("Quickest draw outside of Dodge City!!\nYou got 'em!")
        elif new_event == 9:
            print("There was a fire in your wagon - Food and supplies damaged!")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - 40
            game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 400
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 15
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - random.randint(1, 8) - 3
        elif new_event == 10:
            print("Lose your way in heavy fog - Time is lost")
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 10 - random.randint(1, 5)
        elif new_event == 11:
            print("You killed a poisonous snake after it bit you")
            game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 10
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 5
            if game_variables["supplies"] < 1:
                print("You die of snakebite since you have no medicine")
                dying("no_supplies")
        elif new_event == 12:
            print("Wagon gets swamped fording river - lose food and clothes.")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - 30
            game_variables["clothing"] = game_variables["clothing"] - 20
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 20 - random.randint(1, 20)
        elif new_event == 13:
            print("Wild animals attack!")
            if game_variables["ammunition"] < 40:
                print("You were too low on bullets - The wolves overpowered you")
                game_variables["injury"] = True
            else:
                my_shooting = shooting()
                if my_shooting > 2:
                    print("Slow on the draw - They got at your food and clothes.")
                else:
                    print("Nice Shootin' Partner - They didn't get much.")
                game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] - (my_shooting * 8)
                game_variables["clothing"] = game_variables["clothing"] - (my_shooting * 4)
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - (my_shooting * 20)
        elif new_event == 14:
            print("Cold Weather!!")
            if game_variables["clothing"] > random.randint(1, 4) + 22:
                print("You have enough clothing to keep you warm.")
            else:
                print("You don't have enough clothing to keep you warm.")
                game_variables = illness(game_variables)
        elif new_event == 15:
            print("Hail Storm - Supplies Damaged")
            game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 200
            game_variables["supplies"] = game_variables["supplies"] - 4 - random.randint(1, 3)
            game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5 - random.randint(1, 10)
        else:
            print("Helpful indians show you where to find more food.")
            game_variables["food"] = game_variables["food"] + 14
    return game_variables

Riders Approaching

As you and your group of settlers travel across the country, there will be a chance that you come upon a group of riders. Could these riders have ill intent, or are they just passing by?

This function determines when riders are located and whether they are friendly. If they are not an attack, you are given several options to defend or attack your foes.

def riders(game_variables):
    my_tactic = 0
    if random.randint(1, 10) > ((game_variables["mileage"] / 100 - 4) ** 2 + 72) / (
            (game_variables["mileage"] / 100 - 4) ** 2 + 12) - 1:
        return
    else:
        if random.randint(1, 10) < 3:
            print("Riders ahead. They don't look hostile.")
            riders_hostile = False
        else:
            print("Riders ahead. They look hostile.")
            riders_hostile = True

        while True:
            try:
                my_tactic = int(builtins.input("\nTactics\n(1) Run (2) Attack (3) Continue (4) Circle Wagons: "))
            except ValueError:
                print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
            if my_tactic > 0 or my_tactic < 4:
                break
            else:
                print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        if riders_hostile:
            if my_tactic == 1:
                # Run
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] + 20
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 150
                game_variables["animals"] = game_variables["animals"] - 40
            elif my_tactic == 2:
                # attack
                my_shooting = shooting()
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - (my_shooting * 40) - 80
                if my_shooting == 1:
                    print("Nice Shooting Tex - You drove them off.")
                elif my_shooting > 4:
                    print("Lousy Shot - You got knifed\nYou have to see Ol' Doc Blanchard.")
                    game_variables["injury"] = True
                else:
                    print("Kinda slow with your Colt .45")
            elif my_tactic == 3:
                # continue
                if random.randint(1, 10) > 7:
                    print("They did not attack.")
                    riders_hostile = False
                else:
                    game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 150
                    game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 15
            else:
                # circle the wagons
                my_shooting = shooting()
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - (my_shooting * 30) - 80
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 25
                if my_shooting == 1:
                    print("Nice Shooting Tex - You drove them off.")
                elif my_shooting > 4:
                    print("Lousy Shot - You got knifed\nYou have to see Ol' Doc Blanchard.")
                    game_variables["injury"] = True
                else:
                    print("Kinda slow with your Colt .45")
        else:
            # riders not hostile.
            if my_tactic == 1:
                # run
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] + 15
                game_variables["animals"] = game_variables["animals"] - 10
            elif my_tactic == 2:
                # attack
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
                game_variables["ammunition"] = game_variables["ammunition"] - 100
            elif my_tactic == 3:
                # continue
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
                print("They did not attack.")
            else:
                # circle the wagons.
                game_variables["mileage"] = game_variables["mileage"] - 5
                print("They did not attack.")

    if riders_hostile:
        print("The Riders were hostile - Check for loses.")
        if game_variables["ammunition"] < 1:
            print("You ran out of bullets and got massacred by the riders!")
            dying("injury")
    else:
        print("The Riders were friendly, but check for possible losses.")
    return game_variables

The Beginning of the Game

With all applications, there is always a beginning. This is the function used to kick off your travel across the country on The Oregon Trail. The game is based on the completion of 19 turns. If not, the trail is closed out due to the weather, and your whole party dies. It’s a grim ending, but many settlers have met that fate on their journeys.

def start_game():
    game_variables = setup()
    if builtins.input("Do you need instructions (yes/no) ") == "yes":
        instructions()

    game_week_dates = ["March 29", "April 12", "April 26", "May 10", "May 24", "June 7", "June 21", "July 5", "July 19",
                       "August 2", "August 16", "August 31", "September 13", "September 27", "October 11", "October 25",
                       "November 8", "November 22", "December 6", "December 20"]

    print("\nHow good a shot are you with your rifle?")
    print("\t(1) ace marksman,  (2) good shot,  (3) fair to middlin'")
    print("\t(4) need more practice,  (5) shaky knees")
    my_shooting = abs(int(builtins.input(
        "Enter one of the above -- the better you claim you are, the\n"
        "faster you'll have to be with your gun to be successful: ")))
    if my_shooting > 5 or my_shooting < 1:
        my_shooting = 0
    game_variables["shooting_expert_level"] = my_shooting
    game_variables = initial_purchases(game_variables)
    game_variables["game_turn"] = -1

    while True:
        try:
            game_variables["game_turn"] = game_variables["game_turn"] + 1
            if game_variables["game_turn"] < 19:
                if game_variables["mileage"] > 2040:
                    final_turn(game_variables)
                    break
                print("\nMonday, " + game_week_dates[game_variables["game_turn"]] + ", 1847")
                game_loop(game_variables)
                do_events(game_variables)
                riders(game_variables)

                # Check to see if you went far enough. There are no mountains for the first 1000 miles of the journey.
                if game_variables["mileage"] > 950:
                    game_variables = mountains(game_variables)

            else:
                print("\nYou have been on the trail too long\nYour family dies in the first blizzard of winter.")
                dying("")

        except TypeError:
            print(game_variables)
            break


if __name__ == '__main__':
    start_game()

Sample Game Play

Do you need instructions (yes/no) no

How good a shot are you with your rifle?
	(1) ace marksman,  (2) good shot,  (3) fair to middlin'
	(4) need more practice,  (5) shaky knees
Enter one of the above -- the better you claim you are, the
faster you'll have to be with your gun to be successful: 1
Wallet: 700. How much do you want to spend on your oxen team: 250
Wallet: 450. How much do you want to spend on your food: 100
Wallet: 350. How much do you want to spend on your ammunition: 100
Wallet: 250. How much do you want to spend on your clothing: 100
Wallet: 150. How much do you want to spend on your miscellaneous supplies: 100
After all your purchases. You now have 50 dollars left.

Monday, March 29, 1847
Total Mileage:    0
Food:             100
Bullets:          5000
Clothing:         100
Misc. Supplies:   100
Cash:             50

Do you want to (1) Hunt, or (2) Continue: 1

You pull your gun, aim, and pull the trigger
 POW!
Right Between the Eyes - You got a big one!! Full bellies tonight!
Do you want to eat (1) Poorly, (2) Moderately, or (3) Well: 2

Monday, April 12, 1847
Total Mileage:    170
Food:             146
Bullets:          4970
Clothing:         100
Misc. Supplies:   100
Cash:             50

Do you want to (1) Stop at the next fort, (2) Hunt, or (3) Continue: 3
Do you want to eat (1) Poorly, (2) Moderately, or (3) Well: 2
Wagon breaks down - lose time and supplies fixing it

Monday, April 26, 1847
Total Mileage:    381
Food:             128
Bullets:          4970
Clothing:         100
Misc. Supplies:   92
Cash:             50

Do you want to (1) Stop at the next fort, (2) Hunt, or (3) Continue: 3
Do you want to eat (1) Poorly, (2) Moderately, or (3) Well: 2

Monday, May 10, 1847
Total Mileage:    595
Food:             110
Bullets:          4970
Clothing:         100
Misc. Supplies:   92
Cash:             50

Do you want to (1) Stop at the next fort, (2) Hunt, or (3) Continue: 

Conclusion

This ported version is close to the source that I used to migrate. The only changes that I made were to make it function smoother with Python. Some of the changes were like the inclusion of lists, dictionaries, and if-if else-else blocks instead of the numerous go-to’s that the source code used before.

This was a fun project to undertake. The biggest head-scratcher was how to convert the nonstructured waterfall design to a more modern Python design. Could there be more changes? Yes. There are sections that I would rewrite to make smoother, but would there be a loss of the look and feel of the original game in that process? Sometimes, the best is the first.

 

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *